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  • Program for Friday, September 19

    Pasticcio From Ten Pieces – Jean Langlais (1907-1991)
    Psalm Prelude, set II, no. 2 – Herbert Howells (1892-1983)
    Vater unser im Himmelreich (BWV 682) – J.S. Bach (1685-1750)
    Jubilate – William Mathias (1934-1992)
    David Harrison is beginning his second year of study at Indiana University’s Jacobs School of Music, pursuing a Master’s Degree in Organ Performance in the studio of Dr. Janette Fishell. He earned the Bachelor of Music degree in Organ Performance at Mississippi College under the instruction of Dr. Robert Knupp. In addition to his work as both an organ recitalist and church musician today, Harrison finds interest in arranging and composing music for organ and congregational singing.


  • Program for Friday September 12

    Praeludium in D Major (BuxWV 139) – Dieterich Buxtehude (d. 1707)

    Sortie in E Flat Major – Louis James Alfred Lefébure-Wély (d. 1869)

    Solemn Melody – Sir Henry Walford Davies (d. 1941)

    Sonata I – Charles W. Ore (b. 1936 – )
    I. Prelude
    II. Voluntary
    III. Recessional

    Buxtehude was a Danish-German organist and composer. He Buxtehude was exposed to the organ at a young age, as his father, Johannes Buxtehude, was the organist at St. Olaf’s church in Helsingør. Dieterich was employed as an organist, first in Helsingborg (1657–1658), and then at Helsingør (1660–1668). St. Mary’s in Helsingør is the only church where Buxtehude was employed that still has the organ in its original location. Buxtehude’s last post, from 1668, was at the Marienkirche, Lübeck which had two organs, a large one for big services and a small one for devotionals and funerals. His works strongly influenced the young Johann Sebastian Bach. This Prelude is comprised of several sections. The introductory portion is improvisational in style, with some call and response. Then follows a fugal section with a thin texture. A bold declaratory statement leads into a toccata-like section and the piece ends with a flourishing statement.

    Lefébure-Wély was a French organist and composer. He played a major role in the development of the French symphonic organ style and was closely associated with the organ builder Aristide Cavaillé-Coll, inaugurating many new Cavaillé-Coll organs. His music tends to be more accessible, not truly trying to provide answers, but are fun and at times even considered vulgar in his time. The term “Sortie” in French means “Exit”, so it most likely was intended to be used as a recessional. This is a fun piece to play, and gives the organ a sense of humor and festivity.

    Davies was an British composer who at one time held the title “Master of the King’s Musick” following the death of Sir Edward Elgar in 1922. He was born into a family of organists, including his brothers and his uncle. He also composed music for orchestra, choir, and piano. This piece was originally written for organ and strings and avoids much of the English pomp or any sense of religiosity. Starting off on the softer stops, using the strings and flutes, and a bold solo on the 8’ stops of the Great. It grows to a grand crescendo, then suddenly drops back into the peaceful serenity of the start of the piece.

    Dr. Ore is a retired professor of music at Concordia University in Seward, NE. He is an accomplished recitalist and composer. He has many works published by Concordia Publishing House, Morningstar Music, and Augsburg Fortress, including several recordings of his works. He continues to serve the church as organist of First Presbyterian Church in Lincoln, Ne. In the late 1970’s, Dr. Paul Bunjes of Concordia University Chicago suggested that composers work to create music that would serve the worship services. From this suggestion, the series called “Music for a Sunday Morning” was developed at Concordia Publishing House. These works were in three parts, functionally providing a Prelude, Voluntary, and Postlude for the organist. Ore was one of the contributors, and this work is the second in this series. Each of the three sections also have three parts.

    Jeffrey A. White, MCM, CAGO has been the Minister of Music of Holy Trinity Lutheran Church since July 1,  2001, and served as Music Director of Holy Cross Lutheran Church in St. Louis for ten years prior to that.  He  has been a church organist since 1982.  He has been conducting handbell choirs since 1986, and vocal choirs since 1989.  Jeff earned a Master of Church Music degree with an organ emphasis through Concordia University Wisconsin, having studied with Dr. John Behnke and Dr. Nancy Ypma.  He has served on the board
    of the St. Louis Chapter of the American Guild of Organists (AGO), and also was an 8-year member of the executive board of the Gateway Ringers.  Jeff has been ringing with this group since 1999. Jeff just also recently earned the “Colleague” certification through the AGO. His day job is working full time for MasterCard.  Jeff lives in Oakville with his wife, two sons, and their lab-beagle mix dog.

     


  • The 1921 Organ

    This grainy image is a photograph of the chancel of Third Baptist Church in 1918, after the building had been remodeled a bit.

    Third Baptist Church in 1918.
    Third Baptist Church in 1918.

    The archway and organ grills had been in place before, but a choir balcony in the back of the chancel was removed. This allowed plenty of space for the planned 60-rank Kilgen organ. The organ was completed in 1921 in the sanctuary of Third Baptist, but destroyed in a fire in 1928 which started in the organ blower. Here is the specification of that instrument:

      George Kilgen & Son, Inc. – 1921
      GREAT

    1. 16 Major Diapason – 73 pipes
    2. 8 Principal Diapason – 73 pipes
    3. 8 Second Diapason – 73 pipes
    4. 8 Gross Flute – 73 pipes
    5. 8 Doppel Flute – 73 pipes
    6. 8 Melodia – 73 pipes
    7. 8 Viol d’ Gamba – 73 pipes
    8. 4 Octave – 73 pipes
    9. 4 Flute Harmonic – 73 pipes
    10. 8 Trumpet – 73 pipes
    11. 4 Clarion – 12 pipes – From no. 11
    12. SWELL

    13. 16 Bourdon – 73 pipes
    14. 8 Diapason Phonon – 73 pipes
    15. 8 Viol d’Orchestre – 73 pipes
    16. 8 Vox Celestes – 61 pipes
    17. 8 Muted Viole – 73 pipes
    18. 8 Stopped Flute – 73 pipes
    19. 4 Flauto Traverso – 73 pipes
    20. 4 Violina – 73 pipes
    21. 2 Flageolet – 61 pipes
    22. III Dolce Cornet – 183 pipes
    23. 16 Contra Fagotto – 12 pipes – From 24
    24. 8 Cornopean – 73 pipes
    25. 8 Oboe – 73 pipes
    26. 8 Vox Humana – 73 pipes
    27. Tremolo
    28. ECHO

    29. 8 Lieblich Gedeckt – 73 pipes
    30. 8 Dolce – 73 pipes
    31. 8 Vox Aetheria – 61 pipes
    32. 4 Fern Flute – 12 pipes – From no. 27
    33. 8 Vox Humana – 73 pipes
    34. Cathedral Chimes
    35. Tremolo
    36. CHOIR

    37. 16 Quintaton – 73 pipes
    38. 8 Violin Diapason – 73 pipes
    39. 8 Dulciana – 73 pipes
    40. 8 Unda Maris – 61 pipes
    41. 8 Concert Flute – 73 pipes
    42. 8 Quintadena – 12 pipes – From no. 34
    43. 4 Flute d’Amour – 73 pipes
    44. 2 Piccolo Harmonic – 61 pipes
    45. 8 Clarinet – 73 pipes
    46. 8 Orchestra Oboe – 73 pipes
    47. Harp
    48. Tremolo
    49. SOLO

    50. 8 Flauto Major – 73 pipes
    51. 8 Stentorphone – 73 pipes
    52. 8 Gross Gamba – 73 pipes
    53. 8 Gamba Celestes – 61 pipes
    54. 4 Flute Ouverte – 73 pipes
    55. 16 Tuba Profunda – 73 pipes
    56. 8 Harmonic Tuba – 12 pipes – From no. 51
    57. 8 Cor Anglais – 73 pipes
    58. 4 Harmonic Tuba – 12 pipes – From no. 51
    59. PEDAL

    60. 32 Double Open Diapason
    61. 16 Open Diapason – 32 pipes
    62. 16 Violone – 32 pipes
    63. 16 Bourdon – 32 pipes
    64. 16 Lieblich Gedeckt – Echo
    65. 8 Flauto Bass – 12 pipes – From no. 58
    66. 8 Dolce Flute – Echo
    67. 8 Violoncello – 32 pipes
    68. 16 Tuba Profunda – Solo
    69. 16 Contra Posaune – 12 pipes
    70. 8 Harmonic Tuba – Solo

  • Friday Pipes resumes in September

    Here is the Friday Pipes Recital Series for Fall of 2014:

    • September 5 – Stephen Price, Resident organist of Beck Chapel at Indiana University
    • September 12 – Jeff White, Minister of Music, Holy Trinity Lutheran Church
    • September 19 – David Harrison, Organist, Irvington United Methodist Church, Indianapolis, Indiana
    • September 26 – Scott Montgomery, Director of Music Ministries and Organist, Holy Cross Church, Champaign, Illinois
    • October 3 – Dr. Joerg Abbing, Hochschule für Musik Saar, Saarbrücken, Germany
    • October 10 – Mark Gifford – Christ The King Catholic Church, Springfield, Illinois
    • October 17 – Craig Datz, Organist, Missouri United Methodist Church, Columbia, Missouri
    • October 24 – Tim Jansen, Music Director, St. Anthony of Padua Church
    • October 31 – Brent Johnson, Organist, Third Baptist Church
    • November 7 – No Recital
    • November 14 – Dr. William Sullivan – Organist, Laclede Groves Chapel
    • November 21 – Bill Stein, Director of Music Ministries, First Presbyterian Church, Kirkwood

    Join us each Friday at 12:30-1:00 for these free concerts!


  • Warranty work on the pedals

    Some tiny springs on the bottom of the Pedal board were the source of a problem last week. The springs and contacts made by the Peterson company were recalled and needed to be replaced. Dan and Aaron Bogue brought a complete new set and are busy adjusting the pedals in preparation for Barbara Harbach’s recital tomorrow afternoon.

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  • Program for April 18 Friday Pipes

    Andrew Peters, Pastoral Musician of Second Presbyterian Church returns to the console today to provide our Friday Pipes recital. Here is his program:

    • Symphony No. 6, op. 59 – V. Finale – Louis Vierne (1870-1937)
    • Improvisation- Pastorale – Jospeh Jongen (1873-1953)
    • Prelude in c minor, S. 546 – Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750)
    • Ten Pieces for the Organ – III. Andante – Joseph Jongen (1837-1924)
    • Introduction, Fugue, and Toccata on a Hymn Tune – Clarence Mader (1904-1971)

    Andrew Peters is Pastoral Musician (Organist/Director of Music) at Second Presbyterian Church in St. Louis. He holds degrees from St. Olaf College and the Cleveland Institute of Music where he studied with John Ferguson and Todd Wilson. He has won numerous competitions and plays at locations throughout the United States. In the past he has performed at venues including St. Philip’s Cathedral, Atlanta; St. Patrick’s Cathedral and the Cathedral of St. John the Divine, New York City; St. Olaf College; DePauw University; and the Lutheran School of Theology in Chicago. He has also played the organ part on music of Britten, Ives, and Bach with the St. Louis Symphony Orchestra including their appearance at Carnegie Hall in the fall of 2013.

    A member of the American Guild of Organists, Peters has served as Dean of the Nashville AGO Chapter, Director for the 2010 St. Louis Pipe Organ Encounter for young organists, and is the Convention Coordinator for the 2015 AGO Regional Convention in St Louis. His released a recording on the 14-rank Schoenstein organ of the Historic Franklin Presbyterian Church in Franklin, Tennessee which was praised by The Diapason and The American Organist. His brass and organ arrangements for congregational singing have been published by MorningStar Music Publishers. A native of West Caldwell, New Jersey, Peters lives with his family in St. Louis city.