+menu-


  • Warranty work on the pedals

    Some tiny springs on the bottom of the Pedal board were the source of a problem last week. The springs and contacts made by the Peterson company were recalled and needed to be replaced. Dan and Aaron Bogue brought a complete new set and are busy adjusting the pedals in preparation for Barbara Harbach’s recital tomorrow afternoon.

    image


  • Program for April 18 Friday Pipes

    Andrew Peters, Pastoral Musician of Second Presbyterian Church returns to the console today to provide our Friday Pipes recital. Here is his program:

    • Symphony No. 6, op. 59 – V. Finale – Louis Vierne (1870-1937)
    • Improvisation- Pastorale – Jospeh Jongen (1873-1953)
    • Prelude in c minor, S. 546 – Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750)
    • Ten Pieces for the Organ – III. Andante – Joseph Jongen (1837-1924)
    • Introduction, Fugue, and Toccata on a Hymn Tune – Clarence Mader (1904-1971)

    Andrew Peters is Pastoral Musician (Organist/Director of Music) at Second Presbyterian Church in St. Louis. He holds degrees from St. Olaf College and the Cleveland Institute of Music where he studied with John Ferguson and Todd Wilson. He has won numerous competitions and plays at locations throughout the United States. In the past he has performed at venues including St. Philip’s Cathedral, Atlanta; St. Patrick’s Cathedral and the Cathedral of St. John the Divine, New York City; St. Olaf College; DePauw University; and the Lutheran School of Theology in Chicago. He has also played the organ part on music of Britten, Ives, and Bach with the St. Louis Symphony Orchestra including their appearance at Carnegie Hall in the fall of 2013.

    A member of the American Guild of Organists, Peters has served as Dean of the Nashville AGO Chapter, Director for the 2010 St. Louis Pipe Organ Encounter for young organists, and is the Convention Coordinator for the 2015 AGO Regional Convention in St Louis. His released a recording on the 14-rank Schoenstein organ of the Historic Franklin Presbyterian Church in Franklin, Tennessee which was praised by The Diapason and The American Organist. His brass and organ arrangements for congregational singing have been published by MorningStar Music Publishers. A native of West Caldwell, New Jersey, Peters lives with his family in St. Louis city.


  • Program for April 4th Friday Pipes

    Horst Buchholz is performing today’s program. It’s entitled “The Organ Light”, Reflections on April 1. The program is:

  • Festive March in D – Henry Smart (1813-1879)
  • Versetti per il Gloria sopra la musica di Mozart – Carlo Moreno (1867-1927)
  • Suite “The Tragedy of a Tin Soldier” – Gordon Balch Nevin (1892 – 1943)
    The Return from the War
    His Jealousy
    His Farewell Serenade
    The Tin Soldier’s Funeral March
  • Processional March – Oscar Verne
  • It looks like a fun program. Hope to see you there at 12:30.

    Dr. Horst Buchholz is Director of Sacred Music and Organist at the Cathedral Basilica and for the Archdiocese of St. Louis and also serves as Artistic Director of St. Louis Cathedral Concerts. He received his first musical training in a boys choir in his native Germany and graduated with degrees and diplomas in organ and church music from the University of Arts in Berlin. After studies in conducting in Bloomington, Indiana, he was awarded the Doctor of Music degree from Indiana University. Buchholz has been active as conductor, organist, and educator in the USA, Mexico, Canada, Korea, Japan, and throughout Europe. He was Director of Music and Cathedral Organist in Denver. Buchholc was also conducting professor at the University of Denver and Music Director of the Denver Philharmonic Orchestra, which named him Conductor Laureate. Prior to his move to St. Louis he served as Canon for Music and Worship at Cleveland’s Trinity Cathedral. He is Vice-President for the Church Music Association of America.


  • wpid-img_20140402_153606.jpgNew plaque

    A new brass plaque commemorating the dedication of the organ has been installed. It credits all of the builders that had a hand in the organ’s life. Some people think it’s odd that there isn’t a builder’s nameplate on the console, but it would be difficult for any one company to take full credit for the completed organ.

    image

    image